Wednesday, August 16, 2017

SAINT BRIGID’S CHURCH [KILLESTER]

SAINT BRIGID’S CHURCH [KILLESTER]



With the building of a large number of houses in Killester, in the 1920’s, a church became necessary for the spiritual needs of the new community. The church was consecrated by the Archbishop of Dublin, Dr. Edward Byrne, on the 26th September 1926. With the large growth of housing developments in the 1940’s and 1950’s it became necessary to increase the length of the church .

SAINT BRIGID’S CHURCH [KILLESTER]-131876

Monday, August 14, 2017

THE FIVE LAMPS IN DUBLIN

THE FIVE LAMPS [NORTH STRAND DUBLIN]

 I am willing to bet that most of you will be surprised to discover that this is a memorial drinking fountain originally named the ‘General henry Hall Memorial Fountain’.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMOUS DUBLIN LANDMARK ...

  THE FIVE LAMPS [NORTH STRAND DUBLIN]-131832THE FIVE LAMPS [NORTH STRAND DUBLIN]-131831 THE FIVE LAMPS [NORTH STRAND DUBLIN]-131830

Saturday, August 12, 2017

THOUSANDS SIGN PETITION [TO SAVE TREES IN FAIRVIEW]

THOUSANDS SIGN PETITION [TO SAVE TREES IN FAIRVIEW]

I am never happy about trees being cut down but in this instance I do not know the full story and may never do so.

Having read the news about the petition I decided to visit Fairview to see what the fuss was about and also it was a good excuse to visit the area.

According to one local that I spoke to the City Council is planning to remove about fifty trees in order to make way for a new cycle path but a second lady explained that as the trees will be replaced by the Corpo [Dublin City Council] she was not interested in the petition.

As the planting began in 1906 some of the trees are over a hundred years old and according to the City Council officials some of the older trees are distressed because of restricted growing space and need to be felled regardless of their plans for a cycleway.

On the main Fairview road there is a large number of trees marked with yellow bands and I assume that these are the trees destined for the chop. However, according to some online accounts it is the trees along the park’s main footpath that are under threat. I think that some reports have used stock photographs of random trees in the park.

By the way the Irish Times are not in favour of the petition see: https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/fairview-trees-row-shows-why-dublin-remains-a-mess-1.3183739




THOUSANDS SIGN PETITION [TO SAVE TREES IN FAIRVIEW]-131778 THOUSANDS SIGN PETITION [TO SAVE TREES IN FAIRVIEW]-131776

DIM SUM NOW AVAILABLE AT MR DINH [CAPEL STREET]

DIM SUM NOW AVAILABLE AT MR DINH [CAPEL STREET]

Some time next week they plan to introduce Dim Sum at Mr Dinh’s Hong Kong style restaurant in Capel Street. I am really excited about this as the restaurant is less than five minutes walk from my apartment.

Dim sum (Chinese: 點心; pinyin: diǎnxīn; Cantonese Yale: dímsām) is a style of Chinese cuisine (particularly Cantonese but also other varieties) prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Dim sum dishes are usually served with tea, and together form a full tea brunch. Dim sum traditionally are served as fully cooked, ready-to-serve dishes. In Cantonese teahouses, carts with dim sum will be served around the restaurant for diners to order from without leaving their seats. The Cantonese tradition of having endless cups of tea and dim sum is also called Yum Cha.

PUBS AND RESTAURANTS ...

DIM SUM NOW AVAILABLE AT MR DINH [CAPEL STREET DUBLIN]-131769

Friday, August 11, 2017

THE WATERWAYS OF GALWAY [RIVERS - CANALS - LAKES]

THE WATERWAYS OF GALWAY [RIVERS - CANALS - LAKES]

I plan to revisit Galway at the beginning of September. My last five visits were in August and the weather has been bad every time. The main problem was rain.


The River Corrib in the west of Ireland flows from Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. The river is among the shortest in Europe, with only a length of six kilometres from the lough to the Atlantic.

The Corrib may be one of Ireland's shortest rivers, but with a mean long term flow rate of 104.8 cubic metres per second, it is Ireland's second largest river, only surpassed by the River Shannon (by flow).



INFOMATIQUE [WILLIAM MURPHY]: THE WATERWAYS OF GALWAY [RIVERS - CANALS - LAKES]--photos &emdash;
RETRO WIND SHELTERS IN CLONTARF [DESIGNED IN 1934 BY HERBERT SIMMS]



 Dating from the 1930s is a number on interesting structures along the Promenade in Clontarf including the wind shelters shown in my photographs.

The shelters were designed by Herbert Simms in 1934. The design and construction such public structures arose from a concern for the welfare of the working class and facilitated a rise in communal outdoor recreation before the advent of modern affordable holidays.

During the 1930s, Dublin Corporation Housing Architect, Herbert Simms, took the dualistic approach to slum clearance of building both new urban blocks and suburban cottages. The flat blocks were considered essential architectural ingredients of the slum clearance project and from 1932 to 1939, twenty-one schemes comprising 1,002 inner-city flats were completed. In 1935 alone 1,552 dwellings were completed.

During the sixteen years he was in office, Simms was responsible for for the design and erection of some 17,000 new homes, ranging from striking blocks of flats in the central city, influenced by new apartment blocks by de Klerk in Amsterdam and J.P. Oud in Rotterdam, to extensive suburban housing schemes such as those at Crumlin and Cabra.



MORE ABOUT SIMMS

  RETRO WIND SHELTERS IN CLONTARF [DESIGNED IN 1934 BY HERBERT SIMMS]-131627
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Saturday, July 15, 2017

MOUNT ST. ALPHONSUS [REDEMPTORIST CHURCH IN LIMERICK]

MOUNT ST. ALPHONSUS [REDEMPTORIST CHURCH IN LIMERICK]



The Redemptorist Church at Mount St. Alphonsus, South Circular Road, Limerick is more than 150 years old. It is open twelve hours every day so it is more accessible than most churches in Ireland and it is well worth a visit and if you do visit you will have plenty of time to view it.

The Redemptorists have been in Limerick since 1853 and are known locally as “The Fathers” and they have had a huge impact on life period however there is a very unpleasant event, the Limerick Boycott in 1904, associated with the order.

The Redemptorists first came to Limerick in 1851 to preach a mission in St John’s. Two years later they established a temporary presence in Bank Place and moved to the present site, which they named Mount St Alphonsus, in 1854. The current church was dedicated on December 7th, 1862.



















Friday, July 14, 2017

St. Saviour's Dominican Church [Now Operated By Nashville Nuns]

St. Saviour's Dominican Church [Now Operated By Nashville Nuns]




In the strong sunlight the stained glass windows were magical.


I used a Voigtlander 15mm lens, a manual focus lens, and I had lots of problems with the camera as it froze a number of times. As a result of my experience using lenses with a Metabones adaptor and the problems that I have had with the  Voigtlander I have finally decided that i will only use Sony glass [the only exceptions being Zeiss Batis and Loxia]

Apparently this church was rescued from closure by nuns from Tennessee.

Some years ago the Dominican Friars in Ireland announced they had embarked on a process of reorganising its commitments in Ireland because of falling numbers and would be withdrawing from Limerick. As a result of their decision St Saviour’s Church, Glentworth Street, which has an 800-year association with Limerick, was due to close but thanks to the Dominican Sisters of St Cecilia it will remain operational as a church.

On the 4th. of July 2016 the last Mass held by the Dominican Order took place. Soon after the Limerick Diocese took over the running of religious services with a Mass at 1pm each day while the nuns moved into the building later in the summer of 2016.


RELIGION IN LIMERICK ...






















THE NEW STATUE OF TERRY WOGAN [THE PEOPLE OF LIMERICK ARE NOT AT ALL IMPRESSED]

THE NEW STATUE OF TERRY WOGAN [THE PEOPLE OF LIMERICK ARE NOT AT ALL IMPRESSED]


A few weeks before my three day visit to Limerick a statue of Terry Wogan was unveiled. However there was a serious problem because the statue looked nothing like the late broadcaster. And the people of Limerick are twice  unhappy because they also dislike the stone memorial to Munster rugby player and coach Anthony Foley which was recently unveiled on Clancy Strand across the river from Terry [I will publish some photographs within  the next few days]


This statue is going to attract lots of Terry’s fans from England and they are all going to be horrified  because it looks nothing like their hero at any stage in his life. One local told me that it looks like Terry if you look at it from a mile away but I am not convinced. I actually spoke to a couple from England and they were a bit confused and wondered if there was another Terry Wogan that they were unaware of.